THE AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING

VOLUME 25 NUMBER 4

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Editorial

Jill Iliffe

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Guest Editorial
Reflections on nursing

Karen Francis

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After the graduate year: a phenomenological exploration of how new nurses develop their knowledge and skill over the first 18 months following graduation
This study sought to explore how new nurses develop their knowledge and skill over the first 18 months following graduation, as well as factors promoting or inhibiting their development.

Key words: nursing education, graduate, transition, professional role, socialisation

Lisa McKenna, RN RM PhD, Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Peninsula Campus, Victoria, Australia. lisa.mckenna@med.monash.edu.au
Jennifer M. Newton, RN EdD, Australian Research Council Post Doctoral Industry Fellow, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Peninsula Campus, Victoria, Australia.

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The strengths and weaknesses of transitional support programs for newly registered nurses
The transition experiences of new graduate nurses from university to the workplace have not changed since the transfer of nurse education to the tertiary sector despite the implementation of transition support programs. This study aimed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of transition support programs for newly registered nurses.

Key words: nurse education, new graduate nurses, transition support programs, socialisation, evaluation

Jennifer Evans, RN, Ed.D, Lecturer, School of Nursing (NSW and ACT), Australian Catholic University National, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. jennifer.evans@acu.edu.au
Elaine Boxer, RN, MN, Nurse Inservice Education Program Coordinator, Nurse Learning Support Service, St Vincents Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia.
Dr Shukri Sanber, PhD, Senior Lecturer. School of Education (NSW), Australian Catholic University National, Strathfield, NSW, Australia.

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Three versus seven day circuit changes of humidified oxygen circuitry: a feasibility study
The study compared the rate of humidifier acquired pneumonia between patients in whom humidifier circuitry is changed every three days with patients in whom circuitry is changed every 7 days in order to assess the feasibility of conducting a large scale randomised controlled trial to test the safety of extending the period between humidified circuit changes from three to seven days.

Key words: Oxygen inhalation therapy, humidity, pneumonia, humidifier circuitry

Joan Webster, RN, RM, BA, Associate Professor, Nursing Director Research, Centre for Clinical Nursing, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. joan_webster@health.qld.gov.au
Laurie Hall, RN, BNSc (Hons), Project Officer, Centre for Clinical Nursing, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
Di Goodwin, BAppSci (Nursing), Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
Susan Bligh, BN, Clinical Nurse, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
Fiona Coyer, RM, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

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Constructing a research based pre-care model to improve mental health interventions for young people
This study had two aims. Firstly, to explore how young people experienced the onset of mental health problems and to investigate their initial interactions with the health system; and secondly, to use these findings to construct a pre-care model that can be used by nurses and other health care professionals to design appropriate interventions.

Key words: Accessing care, first episode, grounded theory, mental health nursing, adolescent, young people, models

Sue Webster, MPHAA, RN, CMH, RM, CPH, Dip HSc, MComH, PhD
Lecturer, Australian Catholic University, School of Nursing, North Sydney, Australia. s.webster@mackillop.acu.edu.au
Lindsey Harrison, MPHAA, BA (Hons), MA, MSc, PhD, Senior Lecturer, School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

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Faking it: social desirability response bias in self-report research
The tendency for people to present a favourable image of themselves on questionnaires is called socially desirable responding (SDR). SDR confounds research results by creating false relationships or obscuring relationships between variables. Social desirability (SD) scales can be used to detect, minimise, and correct for SDR in order to improve the validity of questionnaire-based research. The aim of this review was to determine the proportion of health-related studies that used questionnaires and used SD scales and estimate the proportion that were potentially affected by SDR.

Key words: socially desirable responding, validity, bias, questionnaire

Thea F van de Mortel, RN, M.HlthSc., FRCNA, FCN (NSW), Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia. tvandemo@scu.edu.au

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Nurses’ and carers’ spiritual wellbeing in the workplace
The aim of the study was to investigate nurses’ and pastoral carers’ spiritual wellbeing (SWB) and how it relates to their workplace.

Key words: Assessing spiritual well-being; SHALOM; spiritual dissonance

John Fisher, MSc, MEd, PhD, Research Manager, Grampians Regional Palliative Care, Research Centre, Ballarat Health Services, Victoria, Australia; Senior Fellow, School of Rural Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. johnfi@bhs.org.au
David Brumley, MBBS, FRACGP, FAChPM, MSc, Clinical Director, Gandarra Palliative Care Unit, Ballarat Health Service and Ballarat Hospice Care Inc; Palliative Care Physician and Director, Grampians Regional Palliative Care Research Centre, Ballarat; Senior Lecturer Rural Medical School, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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How do nurses describe health care procedures? Analysing nurse-patient interaction in a hospital ward
Nurses’ communication skills have a significant impact on their professional effectiveness. This study examines the communication strategies used by nurses on the ward in one aspect of the job, namely the ways that they describe health procedures to patients.

Key words: Nurse-patient communication, describing medical procedures, discourse analysis, authentic data, sociolinguistics

George Major, BA, Diploma in Sign Language Interpreting, MA, Research assistant, Language in the Workplace Project, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.
Janet Holmes, BA Hons (1st class), MPhil, FRSNZ, Professor of Linguistics, Director, Language in the Workplace Project, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand. Janet.Holmes@vuw.ac.nz

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The effect of providing information to patients on their perception of the intensive care unit
The objective of this study was to examine the effect the provision of information about the physical and technological environment of the intensive care unit (ICU) had on whether patients felt discomfort during their ICU experience.

Key words: ICU, patients’ experiences, information, nursing, technological instruments

Nadiye Özer, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey. nozer@atauni.edu.tr
Rahşan Akyil, Msc, Research Assistant, School of Nursing, Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

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A mixed methods study on the needs of Korean families in the intensive care unit
The aim of this study was to achieve an understanding of the needs and experiences of Korean families in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Key words: Mixed methods study, intensive care unit, Korean families

Sungeun Yang, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of Consumer and Child Studies, College of Human Ecology, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea. syang@inha.ac.kr

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Comparison of psychosocial adjustment in people with diabetes with and without diabetic foot ulceration
To determine whether psychosocial adjustment to illness differs in people with diabetes between those who have or do not have diabetic foot ulceration.

Key words: Type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot ulceration, psychosocial adjustment to illness, metabolic control

Asli Talaz Akca, Msc, RN, Internal Diseases Nursing, Gulhane Military Medical Faculty, Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Marine and Undersea Department, Istanbul, Turkey.
Sezgi Cinar, PhD, RN, Nephrology Nursing, Lecturer, Assistant Professor, Marmara University, Collage of Nursing, Istanbul, Turkey. sezcinar@hotmail.com

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Turkish nurses’ concerns about home health care in Turkey
The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ concerns regarding the introduction of home health care in Turkey.

Key words: home health care, nurses, Turkish health system

Sezer Kisa, MSc. PhD, Gazi University, School of Nursing, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. sezer@gazi.edu.tr

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Innovative practice in the management of chronic Hepatitis C: introducing the nurse practitioner model
Chronic hepatitis C is a major health burden world wide. Only 1% of people with hepatitis C in Australia have access to treatment. This paper addresses the issue of motivating people with hepatitis C to seek treatment and the strategy of introducing the nurse
practitioner role to effect this change.

Key words: nurse practitioner, hepatitis, advanced nursing practice

Saroj Nazareth, RN, BHlth Sc, MSc, MN, Nurse Practitioner, Liver Service, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia.
saroja.nazareth@health.wa.gov.au
Carol Piercey, RN, PhD, Lecturer, School of Nursing, Curtin University of Technology, School of Nursing, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
Patricia Tibbet, RN, BApp.Sc.Nursing, MRCNA, Executive Director of Nursing, Royal Perth Hospital;
Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Curtin University of Technology, Western Australia.
Wendy Cheng, MD, FRACP, Head, Liver Service, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia.

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Young people and alcohol misuse: how can nurses use the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion?
Alcohol misuse in Australia society is a community issue that can be addressed successfully within a health promotion framework. It is important that strategies are not perceived as ‘quick fixes’ but work toward addressing some of the underlying structural factors that contribute to the problem.

Keywords: alcohol, youth, Ottawa charter

Bernadette Ward, RN, Midwife, Grad Cert Ed, MPHandTM, MHlth Sci, Lecturer, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia. B.Ward@latrobe.edu.au
Glenda Verrinder, RN, Midwife, Grad Cert Higher Ed, Grad Dip Pub and Com Health, MHlth Sci , Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia.

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