THE AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING

VOLUME 34 ISSUE 4

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Rotating shift work and colorectal cancer among nurses and midwives: a cross-sectional study
The main aim of this study was to explore any association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and rotating shift work in nurses and midwives. The secondary aim of this study was to identify risk factors for CRC in nurses and midwives who are rotating shift workers.

KEY WORDS: Rotating shift work, shift work, colorectal cancer, colon cancer, nurses, midwives

Kalana Wickremaratne, RN, BN,Honours Scholar, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, QLD, Australia
Haakan Strand, RN, NP, PhD, Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, QLD, Australia
Isabella Zhao, RN, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, QLD, Australia

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Elements to promote a successful relationship between stakeholders interested in mental health promotion in schools
An evaluation of a mental health promotion program called iCARE which depended on collaboration between multiple partners. A qualitative exploratory evaluation that involved purposeful sampling of a range of stakeholders in the School settings.

KEY WORDS: Community engagement, collaboration, mental health, health promotion, resilience

Christine Handley, RN, RPN, MEd, FACMHN, FACN, Senior Lecturer, University of Tasmania and Assistant Director of Nursing, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Tasmania, Australia
Professor Margaret McAllister, RN, Ed D, CMHN, FACMHN, FACN, Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, CQU University, Noosa campus, Noosaville, Queensland, Australia

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Accessibility and outcomes from a rural diabetes nurse-educator led self-management program
To investigate factors associated with access to, and health outcomes of, a diabetes nurse-educator led self-management program for rural Australians with diabetes.

KEY WORDS: access, diabetes nurse educator, diabetes self-management, health outcomes, rural, primary health care

Diane Roberts, RN, BN, Grad Dip Adv Nursing, Grad Cert Health-Self Management, Dip Business, Chronic and Complex Condition Program Coordinator, Research Capacity Building Program participant, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Bernadette Ward, RN, MPH, MHSc, PhD, Senior Research Fellow, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Deborah Russell, MBBS, FRACGP, MClinEpid, PhD, Research Fellow, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Belinda O’Sullivan, BPhysio (Hons), MPH (Hons), Grad Dip App Epi, PhD candidate, Research Fellow, Monash University, Victoria, Australia


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A paediatric nurses’ journal club: developing the critical appraisal skills to turn research into practice
The aim of this study was to determine if implementation of a regular journal club improves critical appraisal confidence and facilitates integrating research literature into nursing practice.

KEY WORDS: nursing, journal club, critical appraisal, survey, paediatrics, confidence

Margaret Purnell, MAppSci (Library & Information Mgt), BN (Midwifery), DipAppSci (Nursing), Northern Territory Department of Health,
Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Gina Majid, Grad Dip (Paediatric Nursing), Grad Cert (Clinical Education), BN, RN, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Dr Virginia Skinner, PhD, MN (Hons), BHSc (Nursing), RN, RM, Northern Territory Department of Health, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia


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Managing medical service delivery gaps in a socially disadvantaged rural community: a Nurse Practitioner led clinic
The aim of this pilot project was to investigate how Nurse Practitioners (NP) manage medical service delivery gaps in a socio-disadvantaged rural Victorian region.

KEY WORDS: Nurse Practitioner; Primary care; Primary health care; Consumer satisfaction

Jo Kelly, MN (NP); Grad Dip Palliative Care; Grad Dip Gerontics; BN; Cert Skin Cancer Medicine; Lymphoedema (Level 1)
What Matters Most, Cowes, Victoria, Australia
Deb Garvey, NP; LLB; MIHM; MN; Grad Dip Crit Care (ED, ICU, CCU), RIPRN; BN; Cert Skin Cancer Medicine; Cert Women’s Health, DG Nurse Practitioner, Grantville, Victoria, Australia
Mary Anne Biro, PhD, RN, Senior Lecturer, Peninsula Campus Operational Lead, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia
Susan Lee, PhD, RN, Senior Lecturer, Director Research Degrees, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia

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Literature review: Why do we continue to lose our nurses?
Nurses encompass the largest professional constituent of the health care workforce in most countries, resulting in the impact of a shortage of these professionals, as immense. A projection in the shortage of nurses is upon us, and the margin in the reduction of these health professionals is thought to be worse than any of the preceding cyclical reductions. More than half of the nursing profession feel they are underpaid and overworked, resulting in the likelihood of patient’s needs not being met, significantly increasing. Lengthy hours, quality of working environments, lack of leadership and the ageing population and workforce, can all be seen as influential factors, in which have the potential to leave this profession in a situation of calamity.

KEY WORDS: Nurses, literature review, nursing shortage, nursing attrition, shortage, ageing workforce, retention

Pete Goodare, BN, RN, Grad Cert Clinical Teach/Learning (nursing), Grad Dip Acute Care (nursing), MClinN (acute care nursing)
The Mater Hospital, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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